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Published: 05 Mar 2008 - 09:10 by aprice1985

Updated: 11 Mar 2008 - 03:30

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A while ago rita gave me a tip about keeping my knuckles to the ceiling on the backhand to open the racquet face, anyone got any similar tips for keeping the ball tight to the side wall on straight drives and volleys?  Currently too many of mine, especially off the back wall seem to hit the side wall somewhere along their path, often being half boasts and this leaves me stuck.

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From Adz - 11 Mar 2008 - 03:30

I know this may be a little more difficult to master, but there is a way of using spin in your stroke to "pull" the ball into the side wall on your shots. I first saw it done really effectively in the Welsh Open last year when Sean Le Roux had some incredibly wall-hugging drop-shots. I sat and watched every one and was amazed at the touch and spin generated. Yes I'd seen similar shots on film, but never seen it done with such accuracy in real life.

 

By turning the racquet face to generate a sideways spin on the ball, it is possible to get the ball to spin along the wall. This is something I've been working on recently (with quite a high effectiveness), but I have to say that the first attempts were badly off-course!! Also, having a spinning ball to pick-off the wall makes the opponents return quite difficult and often loose.

 

I wonder if we can find any photos of those shots?? Photographers?????

 

Adz

 

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From rippa rit - 08 Mar 2008 - 08:49

The Boston Harvard photos are excellent and we thank the keen photographers for forwarding them on for our members to share .  I have just added a few more pics to that post. 

aprice - study each photo and take particular notice of the racket face, particularly in relation to the side wall, as that is the key to the direction the ball will take once it leaves the racket.  You know, if you can imagine the racket being the "steering wheel of a car"...often if players were driving on the court they would have hit a tree many times and crashed...oops!!

I hope this gives you more understanding of the strokes.

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From rippa rit - 06 Mar 2008 - 13:09

aprice - it should have read "Latest Library discussion" tab .... sorry, I was too lazy to check the exact wording... see the tab under the Members Forum right at the bottom on the Home Page.

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From aprice1985 - 06 Mar 2008 - 09:03

Where is the latest forum discussion tab? i cant seem to find it?

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From rippa rit - 06 Mar 2008 - 07:38   -   Updated: 06 Mar 2008 - 07:55

A pic from the Harvard Uni Boston sent direct from Colleen Turner this morning.  She must have been listening!

Aprice - See further discussion on this in the "Latest Forum Discussion tab". Can you make out the "H" in the pic of Lincou that I refer too.

Here is a good demo in the gold video clips of the back wall continuous drive.

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From SamBWFC - 05 Mar 2008 - 23:21

If you're hitting half boast type shots, it seems like you are hitting the ball too late. Try to take the ball a little bit earlier, remember to be facing the side wall (shoulders parallel to the side wall) and try not to put too much power in the swing, focus on accuracy and the power will come itself.

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