Info for Your Squashgame

One Stop String Shop

Published: 20 Nov 2006 - 20:52 by BizarreCo

Updated: 18 Jun 2013 - 17:44

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After spending literally hours scouring the internet for some informative squash string reviews, I was hugely disappointed with what I found. Given that this site is run by players for players and contributed to by the type of people that actually want to know this information, I'm inviting you all to write a review of your string types on this thread. There are some things that I'd like you all to include as part of your review, which may make very interesting reading for the others on the site:

  1. Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s))
  2. The racket Brand and Model which contains the string
  3. What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)
  4. Your location
  5. Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)
  6. Your average time between restrings
  7. Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)
  8. Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc)

 

I hope this will turn into a One-Stop-Shop for people looking for new string types and I invite people who aren't members to join and add their opinions.

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT EVERYONE HAS THEIR OWN OPINIONS ON THINGS AND IF SOMEONE'S VIEW CONTRADICTS YOURS THEN YOU SHOULDN'T BE CRITICAL. JUST POST YOUR OWN VIEWS AND OPINIONS FOR OTHERS TO SEE AND UNDERSTAND!

Many thanks!

Adz

squash game squash extras How to add images to Members' Forum posts and replies here... PSA Squash TV - North American Open 2012

Replies...

Please Note: The most recent replies are now at the top!

From rippa rit - 18 Jun 2013 - 17:44

There are 12 articles written in reply to this topic.  I guess you have looked at the Relevant Content tab at the top lefthand side column for some good reading.

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From Ingo - 18 Jun 2013 - 08:51

 Oops, missed a few details. I'm a runner, big on control and not a power player.

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From Ingo - 18 Jun 2013 - 08:47

 Hi guys. Love the info sharing, so here's my bit:

prince rebel with tecnifibre x ones 1.18. I bought a roll for 160 (thanks lancoshire squash) with a few mates, so works out £8 per set and hopefully should keep us going for a while. I'm playing 3 - 5 times per week and they last from 3 - 9 months, rotating two racquets.

These are strung at 25lbs, mainly because that's the middle of the road recommended on the racquet. I didn't know you should go looser with thinner strings, but very happy with it like this as seems to have amazing power and touch, compared to my previous strings (the green, larger diameter tecnifibre - don't know the name but the usual ones everyone gets, I've had these a while and thought they were great at t 25lbs too, but nothing on x ones; I also had some technifibre synthetic gut strings, ie low end, cheaper ones, but these were complete dogs at 25 lbs - rubbish power and not much feel).

I'll be sticking with the x ones for a while and not game to change tension, as It feels so good now...

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From Stonehands - 12 May 2012 - 01:34

Has anyone tried the new Dunlop "Explosive" squash string?  Seems Dunlop is trying to compete with the Tecnifibre 305 / bi-phase line up.  Curious to know if people like it or not?  Tecnifibre prices seem to be on the rise of late...

Thanks!

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From tomdenners - 03 May 2012 - 23:32   -   Updated: 04 May 2012 - 01:36

2 more from me here (both of these strings have previously been reviewed):

Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s))

1: PN19 (black) @ 26lbs (on advice of my stringer) 

2: PN18 (red) @ 26lbs

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string

 

TF Dynergy Tour 125

 

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)

Around £22 each (£10 labour) 

 
Your location

 

London, UK

 

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)

It varies I'd say I'm an all rounder but I pride myself on kills, volleys and drops 

 
Your average time between restrings

 

3 - 4 months 

 

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)

 

Broke x-one after about 5 months
Broke PN19 after 3 weeks.

 

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc)


PN19's felt really good, great touch and i could impart a LOT of spin on to the ball and still generate a lot of power. BUT, they didn't last long and broke within 3 weeks (I did have a problem with one grommet protector (now fixed), but the break was in the sweetspot so I don't think that was the reason). With an unlimited budget I would use these (after i'd tried the 305 first!)

 

I've moved to PN18's which I have on my Head Ti Nano 115 (spare) and I'm really happy with the performance of these strings. These are powerful, but I can 'feel' the ball just as well and I'm generating enough spin (though not as much as with the PN19's). I know the PN 18 is a durable string and I'm not anticipating a break in the near future.

 

I got my friend's racket restrung with TF 305 (@27lbs in a Head Ti Nano 120) the other day though and really liked that (felt really nice to punch the ball down the rails, with just as much vigour as the PN18 even at a higher tension) , so I may have a go when the PN18 starts to feel dead.

 

I'm still relatively new to all this, so my preference I think will be to try every string on the market before I decide on my setup!

 

Tom

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From Adz - 21 Oct 2011 - 22:45

I put some UN18 into someone's racket this week and took it on court myself to have a knock whilst I was waiting for them to pick it up. It felt awful! Amazing how you get used to whatever you put in your rackets over time (the guy thought it was the best string job he'd ever had and that it felt fantastic - so much so that he played outstanding in his team match that night and beat a much better player!).

 

It really does come down to the preference of the player with strings I guess. Certain strings seem to suit certain styles of play, but the make up of the strings can vary tremendously.

 

For example, a touch player might opt for a thicker, softer string with texture (e.g. Supernick XL), whilst a power player might opt for a thinner, stiffer string (e.g. Powernick 19), but this is where things can also get turned on their heads. I'm a more touch orientated player, but I love using the PN19. I find the thin, stiff string gives a crisp bite into the ball and allows me better feel during the shots. Changing back to the slightly thicker and medium stiffness of the UN18 felt awful.

 

It really is something that you need to experiment with to get right for yourself and that's when it starts to get expensive! If I was stringing for a touch player who wasn't sure what to have then I'd start with either PN19, UN18, SN-XL, TF305 (1.2mm) and a firmer tension (Around 26-30lbs like Tom suggests - I'd use 28lbs). If a player came to me looking for out and out power then I'd probably use PN18, UN18 or TF305 (1.2mm) but at a lower tension (26lbs on the Ashaways and 27lbs on the TF).

 

It really is so hard to get right, and I know that I string quite firmly compared to other stringers in my area (they opt for 24-26lbs on most jobs, 28lbs for the best level players if asked specifically).

 

If you fancy the change and like touch play then bite the bullet and go with the UN18, PN19 or TF305 (1.2mm) strung at 28lbs. It should be just about right, but will take you a few hits to get used to.

 

Cheers

 

Adz

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From tomdenners - 21 Oct 2011 - 20:38

If I was you I'd go for something like Ultranick (slightly more feel) / Powernick (more power obv) 18 and string it from 26lbs (more power) - 30lbs (more control) depending on your preference.

From my (limited) experience, it's very much a "suck it and see" process. No amount of research will guarantee a perfect set up first time.

I've also found that a lot of it is in the head. One day you'll have a great game and love your set up, the next, you'll want to smash the racket to pieces and start with something else! You want to give whatever calibration you go for a good run of games to evaluate it.

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From craig80 - 20 Oct 2011 - 05:50   -   Updated: 20 Oct 2011 - 05:51

Thanks Adz (I think!?) for your reply. So should I go for a certain type of string and tension?  If I'm a touch/accuracy player would I need thin string with high tension?

 

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From Adz - 14 Oct 2011 - 23:10

Hi Craig, changing strings can be as much of a preference by the player as anything else. Sometimes you'll just know when the string bed feels lifeless and then it can be time to change the strings to get the maximum performance. With moderate playing time this is usually about 3 months for most players, but it can become more of a habit than a necessity. If I use the same example from my squash shoes..... I tend to change them every 3-4 months as I've very heavy (105 kgs) and the heels compact in the shoes and increased shock tends to transfer to my foot on heel strikes. When I put on a new pair of shoes I can instantly feel that spring and bounce that new squash shoes give you. My strings are the same thing. Once they stretch and lose elasticity, they don't feel so snappy during shots. When I replace them with new strings they have a new "bite" to them.

I've used people's rackets who've had the same string for a very long time (over 6 months) and personally I can feel a difference between the old string (quite flat) and the new string (springy), but some people can't tell any difference at all, so it could just be down to the players preference. One thing to note is that changing strings becomes habit if you do it because the string feels dull or lifeless. It can get into your head that your strings are old and need changing and suddenly you could be changing them every 4-6 weeks (I change mine every 3 months at a guess).

So in answer to your question, yes old strings can sometimes do with changing, but only you will know for certain. You might see a benefit with new strings (which will start an addiction!), but then again you might not!

Good luck either way!

 

Adz

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From craig80 - 12 Oct 2011 - 04:38   -   Updated: 12 Oct 2011 - 04:38

Hi all, I've been reading this thread and just realised how technical it is.  I don't know much about which string to ask for, I'm guessing more expensive=better?!

What I really need someone to tell me is what string and tension to ask for next time.  The first and only time I had my racket re-strung was back in June and got the cheapest and asked for equal power/touch ratio.  It cost me £20 but now know I can get cheaper elsewhere.

My game is predominately touch/drops and placement.  I play 2/3 times a week. I've been told to add another 20mph on my cross courts and line shots but that's another issue! (or is it?!)

As you can see I'm quite confused and need help!  I've just joined a 6 division league and been told I'm at a 3rd division standard so would it be wise to change my strings mid-season??

Thanks for any advice!

C

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From Adz - 05 Oct 2011 - 02:00

Yet another addition for me!

 

Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s))

Ashaway Powernick 19 (black), strung @ 29 lbs

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string

Karakal Tec-Lite 130

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)

£7.50 for the string, but I string myself so no labour (takes about 20 mins)
 
Your location

Swansea, UK

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)

Moderate power with high level of control. I often use spin and cut on the ball so a thin yet durable string is essential to my game.

Your average time between restrings

I string the rackets once the feel goes dead. I'd say on average per racket once every 3-4 weeks but I rotate 4 rackets regularly meaning I only restring all 4 every 3 months.

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)

I haven't broken a set of the PN19s yet, but one of my rackets with the most use (about 12 hours) does have some signs of wear at the string cross points, but this appears only cosmetic (a greying of the string) at this point.

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc)


I prefer a string that's both durable and thin and when the powernick 19 came out I knew it was one worth trying, and I'm glad I did! The string has incredible bite on the ball allowing for excellent spin and control, but the stiffness took some getting used to when I first put them in. Power from a thin and stiff string was never going to be an issue and when you hit the ball cleanly it flies effortlessly off the racket. An interesting note comes with regard to mishits. On occasion I mis-hit the ball near the top of the frame when attacking tight rail shots. This can sometimes break strings right at the top of the racket frame (I had mega problems with X-One doing this which cost me a fortune!). This string has taken everyone of those shots and kept going strong. Certainly a durable string when it comes to catastrophic breakage, but I'm going to reserve my judgement on wear and tear durability until I've had chance to use them for longer on court to see if the string wears through at the cross points. Only concerns so far (about 12 hours use) is that the cross points have greyed slightly in colour which may or may not just be a cosmetic issue.

 

Cheers

 

 

Adz

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From tomdenners - 14 Sep 2011 - 19:01   -   Updated: 14 Sep 2011 - 19:02

An update on my previous post....

The X-one has started to notch and fray as expected. The touch is superb, I'm playing some outlandish drops. I wasn't overly keen on the strings until this started to occur though (for a couple of weeks).

From a power perspective, I've got plenty. I'm very tempted to try Ultranick on this racket, but the setup is so good I might just restring with X-one, though at a slightly higher tension. The strings have a tendancy to move around a lot even now which is annoying.

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From Squish - 22 Aug 2011 - 12:13   -   Updated: 22 Aug 2011 - 12:18

Your string type(s)

  • Wilson Helixx 17-guage(?) @25-26lbs, Tecnifibre X-One Biphase 18-guage @24-25lbs

The magic wand(s)

  • Wilson [K] 115 @ 24lbs, Wilson [K] 135 @ 25lbs (current tensions with TF X-Ones)

What you pay per restring (labour and tring costs)

  • £12 labour, £10-12/string set

Your location

  • Manchester, UK / Hoboken,  NJ

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)

  • Depends on opponent playing style; usually fast and shot-based with the [K]115 and more retrieval and touch with the [K]135

Your average time between restrings

  • Just restrung for the first time after breaking stock strings- I'm weak :) Now I'm trying to find a setup that agrees with me.

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)

  • I'm mostly a control player - my old stock strings (Wilson Helixx 17s(?) @ 26lbs) broke after two 8-week summer seasons, about 2-3 hours per week. Tried to get a little more power from my current setups (TF X-Ones @ 24&25lbs) and after 10 hours on each racket there's a lot of wear on the crosses, will update when they go...

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc

  • The Helixxs (or maybe Helicces?) felt quite lively to me at their peak, I found it easy to generate power and control when needed and there was just enough bite for adding spin. Overall, not bad strings to learn on and develop your style of play.
  • With the TF X-Ones strung at 24&25lbs I'm finding power generation very easy for good depth and pace, with control however at these tensions I'm struggling to get used to the contact time/feel. Whilst the bed is lively and elastic, I'm finding the contact a bit too "woolly" for consistent dropshots. They have about 8-10 hours of playtime on them and are looking nice and fluffy as I hear X-Ones get, though mostly on my crosses. There's already a fair bit of movement developing in the bed at this point and after every match, new/further wear is noticeable. So, not the most durable of strings but a lovely feel to them imho. I would love to try them strung tighter (27-29lbs) perhaps to see what the tighter bed feels like, as whilst the power's nice, I miss my finesse shots.

 

 

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From tomdenners - 23 Jun 2011 - 08:20   -   Updated: 23 Jun 2011 - 08:22

 Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s))

TF x-one biphase 1.18 strung at w/e the factory tension is (guessing about 24)

 

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string

 

TF Dynergy Tour 125

 

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)

 

Came with the racket
 
Your location

 

London, UK

 

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)

 

Hard hitting but plenty of disguise and drops

 

Your average time between restrings

 

2 months.

 

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)

 

I'm not a string breaker really, I restring when the racket feels dead.

 

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc)


This racket is designed for power power power, but fresh out the wrapper it seems to have excellent touch. Drops and lobs are feeling great so far, super consistent and accurate.

 

The power is making my lob serve difficult to consistently play and this is the only real downside from what I can see. I will be stringing this at a higher tension next time.

 

There is so much power here, I can afford to sacrifice some for a bit more control,  I've never used x-one before having only really used PN 18. I MUCH prefer the x-one at the moment, but can't comment on durability as of yet. THis has never been an issue for me however.

 

I think I'm a convert. Any feedback would be appreciated of course!

 

Cheers

 

 

Tom

 

 

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From sarahcoles - 24 May 2011 - 14:21

Tecnifibre Strings

  • Average restrings per reel: 21
  • 1.30 - Good all-round string that compromises between power and control
  • 1.20 and 1.10 - Extra thin string for extra ball speed
  • As used by many top players
  • Maximum shock absorption

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From sloejp - 19 May 2011 - 16:37

just got dunlop aerogel pro strung with supernick xl pro at 25lbs mains, 23lbs crosses. this time i tried a stringer that i hadn't gone to before, and she was super fast. i'm happiest playing in the front court. this setup has enough pop for deep rails and enough bite to hit front court nicks. life is good. supernick certainly has a unique feel to it, but once you get into it it's hard to give it up

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From Adz - 17 May 2011 - 18:58

I'm glad that people are still finding this thread useful. I wish I could spend more time on here, but for now I'm stuck with crazy amounts of work and not enough play!
 
Here's my latest addition:
 

Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s))

Ashaway Ultranick 18 (blue), strung @ 30 lbs

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string

Dunlop Aerogel Pro GT

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)

£7.50 for the string, but I string myself so no labour (takes about 20-25 mins)
 
Your location

Swansea, UK

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)

Moderate power with high level of control. I often use spin and cut on the ball so a thin yet durable string is essential to my game.

Your average time between restrings

I string the rackets once the feel goes dead. I'd say on average per racket once every 3-4 weeks but I rotate 4 rackets regularly meaning I only restring all 4 every 3 months.

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)

I have yet to break a set of the Ultranick 18 and I'm only aware of 1 person I have used this string for breaking a set within the last 4 months. Pretty durable stuff!

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc)


Like I said, I require a string that's both durable and thin. I've used super soft strings and also very stiff strings in an attempt to find some that's just right for me. Finally I've settled on the ultra nick after a brief love affair with the T/F X-One 18. I find the current string is soft enough to give me good feed back aiding my touch play, but stiff enough to give a reassuring snap during power shots. So far I've managed to convert quite a lot of players to the same string, all using different rackets. Worth trying if you can find a cheap stringer, but I've seen loads of people trying to charge stupid amounts of money (£25?!?!) to restring. I normally charge people £17 for the job which gets me about £9 or £10 labour depending on the racket (I say this as different rackets use different string quantities which increases the costs!). The Ultra nick comes in at £1 per m on a reel (£110 for 110m)

 

Cheers

 

 

Adz

 

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From tomdenners - 17 May 2011 - 03:15   -   Updated: 17 May 2011 - 03:28

I doubt that this review will be particularly useful, but this fantastic thread needs a bump and some more reviews (maybe even its own section on the website!)

 

Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s))

Ashaway Powernick 18 (red), strung @ 25 lbs

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string

Head Titanium Nano 115

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)

£9.50 for the string £15 for the labour.

Your location

London, UK

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)

Started off as power player, but more and more heading towards touch.

Your average time between restrings

N/A this is my first time using a restrung racket

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)

N/A as I’ve only started playing regularly fairly recentlyl.

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc)

Have used them all of this week (5 matches). Very good so far, noticeably better than the Head synthetic gut that was originally in there! I’m really generating some speed and putting the pressure on opponents this week, which I’ve not been able to do as effectively previously. Despite being primarily intended for power the control appears to really tight, although it took some getting used to initially.

I’m incredibly curious now, so I’m fairly sure that I’ll be trying all sorts of different strings in the coming months. I’m going to restring my spare with UN 18 and see how that goes.

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From Eddy01741 - 18 Feb 2009 - 01:05

Alright, new strings for me (that I finally got the tension right on) deserve a new review!

Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s))

Ashaway Supernick XL Ti 17 Gauge/1.25mm

Tension is 32.5/31 (main/cross) on the machine I was using, but that likely equates to around 23-25lbs of tension in real life (just an estimate, since I know the machine is obviously wrongly calibrated)

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string

Dunlop Aerogel Tour

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)

$7.75 for the string (bought online), self-restrung so free for labor.

Your location

New England, USA

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc)

Fast and kind of a big hitter (although with good control too), I hard, long rails to the back as well as kill shots right above the tin, boasts and drops are used when needed.

Your average time between restrings

N/A, I restrung these since my last PowerNick 18s were at too low of a tension (likely 18-19lbs of tension)

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)

N/A

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc)

Used them two times so far, but very good so far, loads of control but still good power. Durability is still in question, I see some notching happening already on some mains, which I guess is not helped by the fact that the cover is just braided fibres as well as the fact that the cover is textured, so more friction and abraision on the shots.

 

Anyhow, like I said, it does make my racquet feel more powerful than before  with the Powernick 18s (likely only because of the correct tension this time), and the control on these is great. Hopefully they will last me at least a month or so.

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From pejrak - 27 Jan 2009 - 00:06   -   Updated: 27 Jan 2009 - 00:08

I wanted to share my bit:

   1. Your string type: Ashaway Super Nick XL Pro, 17 gauge/1.25mm (dark blue/gray), strung to 11/10KG
   2. Rackett: Dunlop Aerogel Ultimate
   3. Paid for restring: $19
   4. Location: Czech Rep.
   5. Game type: Fast, big runner, still working on technique with coach
   6. Average time between restrings: less than 20 hours of play
   7. Average time between breaking strings: I restring when they brake
   8. General review comments about the strings: From gameplay viewpoint, I find them giving a very nice touch as well as bite, second best after the SuperNick XL (the white ones with some red and blue fibers). Nowadays, I aim for durability and hoped that these strings would give me more than 20 hours of play. They seem to last a bit longer than SuperNick XL, but I cannot get it last longer than 15 hours. It appears that when the strings move out of position, they cut into each other in intersections, wear off the fibers on coat and snap. I guess, so far the most durable discussed here are Powernick 17 Turquoise, I am aiming for those next and will post the result.

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From hamburglar - 21 Jan 2009 - 02:37

I string my own racquets and I personally like tecnifibre (225 more than the 305). I have noticed some tecnifibre breaking prematurely, with older strings. Maybe it's the age, drying out, or UV damage sitting in a shop, or it may even be factory rejects that someone repackaged. There are plenty of knockoffs out there, some engenious people in overseas countries are quite good at making it look like the real thing.

I find the tecnifibre 225 gives me the most power, so I can reduce my swing and focus more on accuracy, but the power is there if I need it. The 225 is also a bit lighter than the 305, side by side, I can swing a racquet faster with the 225.

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From Adz - 20 Jan 2009 - 18:55

Bosartek,

 

At first I didn't believe it either, but 1 set of supernick XL Pro, clean break, under 30mins and one set of powernick 18 in under 45 mins with a clean break. No idea how as I've met players who hit harder with slice and still don't break strings that quickly! He also broke a set of powernick on the frame, but I didn't count that one! He was using a Dunlop ICE Tour at the time and not what I would consider a high tension! Although the same player clean broke a frame the other day without hitting the wall!!!

Most likely just unlucky, but he is a big string breaker!

 

Eddy,

I've said on a few other threads that for some reason I just don't like using Tecnifibre. It just doesn't feel right to me. But in terms of a review I'd have to say:

Tecnifibre 305 1.2mm

Characteristics: Soft, elastic string

Plasma Injected (?) string made up of lots of little fibres bound together to give the closest thing to true gut like performance available on the market. Excellent in all areas at this guage (note also the 225 in a 1.1mm and the 305 in the 1.3mm), balancing power, bite and durability. On paper it is a great string and I know many players who go out of their way to get it strung in their racquets.

The make-up of the string will mean that as it begins to wear it will fray. The contact points of the crosses and mains will look like they have fur on them, and as time progresses this will eventually wear through completely and snap. However due to the materials used, the string feels incredibly "sticky" when contacting the rubber of the ball. This give better ability to add spin even at thicker guages.

As I said, I'm honestly not a fan (although I couldn't really explain why), so perhaps there's someone else on here with a true "user's review"

 

Cheers

 

Adz

 

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From bosartek - 20 Jan 2009 - 15:30

Adz,

Just curious... where on the racquet/ which strings always break in your friend's racquet? Is it a catastrophic break [along the frame] or is it a "legitimate" break in the middle of the sweet spot? Does he string at a very high tension? Even John White doesn't go through strings that fast!

I often use/restring Powernick 18 and have never seen a clean break within such a short period of time. As you described for the 17s, I've also had the outer jacket wear off completely on the 18s and, with only a few of the inner Zyex threads remaining, the strings still would not break... even when intentionally trying to break them with my foot/shoe!

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From rippa rit - 20 Jan 2009 - 08:13   -   Updated: 20 Jan 2009 - 08:39

Eddy this thread listed in the "Relevant Content" tab gives quite a bit on TF305.

Here is what Stringit have to say about Technifibre 305:

"The Tecnifibre 305 SPL provides improved durability, and high resiliency for increased power and reduced shock during ball impact. It is used by many of the top ranked players in the world.

Composition: Multifilaments,Polyurethane

Gauge: 17g/(1.20mm)

Length: 9.70 metres

Type: Synthetic/Multifilament

Misc.: Prestretch Required

Colour: Green "

This is the first time I have heard "prestretch" mentioned. 

I would not get too excited about the fact that the top players are using the strings as they would have 6 sponsored rackets including a roll of string in their bag. I think durability does come into the equation for club players.  Raystrach mentioned the freying happening if you hit the ball with slice/spin and I guess in general use the open face shots a greater percentage of the time (this would cause more string movement as well).

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From Eddy01741 - 20 Jan 2009 - 02:47

Alright Adz, just wondering, do you have a revew on the Tecnifibre 305s? I'm just wondering what you think of the string (it'd be helpful for the next direction I'd want to go in for strings). I know it's one of the most popular strings out there (along with the Supernicks), but there arn't too many reviews here for it.

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From Adz - 19 Jan 2009 - 23:40

Eddy.... Good to see the old threads getting a visit!

 

Once again it's been a long time since I've added reviews on here, but I've got one or two new ones to add.......

 

Ashaway Powernick 17 Turquoise: 17 gauge (@ 22lbs)

Used in: Dunlop ICE Elite / Dunlop Aerogel Ultimate / Head Mircogel Extreme

Paid: UK price of £7 per set / £85 per reel)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: Recent racquet changes have led to me experimenting with different strings which get to bed in enough to play, but don't stay in long enough to suffer a lot of wear.

REVIEW:

My last review was on the Powernick 18 Red and things were going great until I began to notice a loss of touch. I hadn't even realised at first, but drops were looser, lobs weren't dying and I was generally struggling with my shots. So before I changed my racquet I decided to try out some new strings (All of which are listed here by myself or others, except for two......)

I was recommended these strings for a friend who constantly broke strings. Ashaway Supernick XL Pros...... Gone in 30 mins! Powernick 18 Red...... Gone in 45 mins! I just couldn't understand how someone could break strings so quickly! So we gave the Powernick 17s a run through and they certainly lived up to expectations. They have a slightly lower touch and power than the powernick 18, but then you'd expect that from the thicker guage. What you do gain is a huge amount of durability. I've seen the outter wrap of these strings completely wear through (by the same string-breaker after A MONTH), and then continue to last for well over another month! So these are definately worth a shout if you break strings easily!

 

SECOND REVIEW

Toalson Bio-Logic Green Spiral: 17 gauge (1.2mm (@23lbs))

Used in: Black Knight Ion Drive

Paid: Single set purchased for around £6 (excluding delivery!)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: Racquet change to the Black Knights to correct touch loss from the Dunlop ICE Elites, but couldn't get the right string. Tried Tecnifibre 305 1.2mm, Ashaway Powernick 18 and 17, Ashaway Supernick XL Pro and Supernick Micro. Still trying out different strings.

REVIEW:

Effectively this string is exactly the same as Tecnifibre 305 1.2mm, but feels a little bit stiffer and a little bit sharper bite into the ball. They  do stretch though. I think 23lbs was too loose to string and I should have upped it by a 1lb or 2. Worth a trial at £6, but not likely to turn people away from Tecnifibre 305!

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From Eddy01741 - 19 Jan 2009 - 09:11

Sorry to gravedig, but I think that this thread should be kept going anyways, I have info on two strings today

Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s)):

Wilson Helixx 17, 17 Gauge, Factory Tension

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string:

Wilson nCode nTour

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs):

N/A, factory strings

Your location:

USA

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc):

Long rails that stick to the sidewalls, killshots, not too much touch game

Your average time between restrings:

This string lasted me 7-8 weeks (which is about 30-45 hours)

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3):

Same as above, I used the Helixx 17s till they broke

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc):

Not the best strings I'd have to say. They are of the nylong multifiliment type, and have a plastic jacket on top of the multifiliments. Can't say they're really bad in a specific way since I've only tried one other string. These have been making notches for a while, and the last 2 weeks of use they started fraying (the plastic jacket like cracked open, and the strings got fuzzy at some crosses), soon after the first signs of fraying, they broke. The feel on this was medium-hard, but that may have just been the tension, life cycle was pretty flat, meaning that it seemed to stay the same (it wasn't like it completely lost power after 4 weeks or anything like that). Overall, just your average default manufacturer strings, so just replace them ASAP if your serious about squash.

 

Second Review

Your string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness) and tension(s)):

Tecnifibre 305, 17 gauge/1.20mm thickness, 24lbs of tension

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string:

Wilson nCode nTour

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs):

This one cost me 15 dollars for the string from the local tennis/squash shop, and 10 dollars to restring

Your location:

USA

Your game type (slow, touch, fast, big hitter etc):

Same as above

Your average time between restrings:

Same as above

Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3):

Same as above

Your general review comments about the strings (talk about feel, power, endurance, life-cycle etc):

This is just after using it for one day, but what an improvement these 305s are over the Wilson Helixx 17 strings. The first thing I noticed was the much softer feel of it, not so soft that I could no longer gauge the strength of my shots, but soft enough to lessen vibrations as well as make my racquet rotate less in my hand when hitting the ball. The power was also way up from the Wilson Helixx strings, could have just been the tension, but still, improved power. I also notice better control from these strings, so I know where the ball is going to go when I hit it almost all the time (unlike my old strings). Lastly, the sweet spot is noticably bigger, before I would often get off-center shots that lacked power and vibrated like hell, doesn't happen very much if at all anymore. I can't comment on the endurance or the life cycle of these strings yet since I've just started playing with them. But all in all amazing strings, a tad expensive, but if you don't break strings too often, I'd say it's worth paying like 5 more dollars for these than bad strings.

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From mike - 31 Aug 2008 - 08:40

I've had the X-One in my racquet for about one month now, playing 4 times a week. I'm starting to get the first bits of fluff developing, which as zatoichi mentioned is normal for a multifillament string (and doesn't affect performance).

I have noticed though that the strings slide a bit, particularly the lower crosses if I hit off centre. I think they settle in time, especially once they start to cut into each other. My stringer said the tension is the same, even if they move position, but I still tend to straighten them to avoid feeling a string move when I hit the ball.  I had strung at 25.5 lbs.

I find the feel of the Technifibre Multifillaments improves over the first month or so.

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From zatoichi - 30 Aug 2008 - 18:02   -   Updated: 30 Aug 2008 - 18:03

well fraying on 225, 305 and and x-one is completely normal, now regarding x-ones tension stability this should also be decent, i have seen tests for 17 guage string strung for tennis @58lbs and they reported a 9 percent tension loss after 24 hours while the strings are setteling in, but this is fairly normal  for mulltifillaments, so inspired by this observation I always prestretch by 10% when stringing biphase and then i string @29lbs in a constant pull electric machine, and this set up works beautifully for me, with my karakal sx100 and I don't have much string movement either...

in conclusion maybe you should try stringing a little higher next time and see what happens..

by the way, was your racket strung on a crank, drop weight or electric machine?

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From yaehbhi - 30 Aug 2008 - 17:15

Hi All,

Can someone comment on the reliability of X-One BiPhase RED 1.18mm. I had my Wilson nCode 120 strung with it, but after using it for only a month (approx 2 times a week play) the string has started to fray on the crossing. I've heard that 305 have the similar issues.

What has been your experience with X-One?

Also, the string seemed to have lost lots of tension. I strung it at 24lbs, and now after a month's play I've to constantly adjust/align the string pattern. Is this common with X-One?

cheers,

 

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From zatoichi - 31 Jul 2008 - 19:22

a few months ago i strung a dunlop holtmelt pro with x-one biphase 1.18@ 28lbs for one of the guys i play with, i strung it with a crank lock out, so naturally there would have been a minor decrease in actual tension between lock out and clamping, anyway he loved the feel @ approx 28lbs i tested it myself, and it felt ok. (I did prestretch the string manually before stringing).

what impresses me with x-one biphase is how lively and dead it is at the same time, (lively=power and dead=control)

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From Adz - 30 Jul 2008 - 17:30

On the N-Code racquets I doubt it would make that much difference for you. Basically the main reason that you would use different cross and main tension is because the mains are longer and tend to naturally have more flex - think of cutting an elastic band into 1/3 and 2/3rds then try stretching both - the longer piece will have more flex in the middle than the shorter one. Same thing goes on racquets with extended mains (like Prince racquets for example).

With the n-code, as with dunlops, they tend to have a rounder shaped head making the mains only a bit longer than the crosses (20cm vs 25cm approx?). There's nothing stopping you from altering the tensions a bit on the mains, but I'm not sure exactly what you'd gain with this type of head design.

Traditionally the crosses are what gives you the bite into the ball and the mains are what gives the flex to provide the power, but lots of other factors will decide whether or not to alter the tension (or even the string types!).

The only thing I'd suggest is to try a few different things out (which could be an expensive trial with x-one!!). Because I string my own racquets I get to trial new things quite often without too much cost, but even I'd wince at the idea of wasting a few sets of x-one as it's so expensive in the first place.

 

Perhaps someone else out there has experience of using the x-one in a rounder-head shaped racquet under different tensions? For me it would only be what I experienced using the Grays Powerflow racquets with different types of strings, and to be honest, changing the ternsions on the mains/crosses didn't make a whole lot of difference for me then (which is why I stick to the same tensions on my dunlops now).

 

Cheers

 

Adz

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From yaehbhi - 30 Jul 2008 - 13:32

Adz, thanks very much for explaining this in so much detail... :)

What is your view about stringing with different tensions in mains and across - what difference does it make to conventional low tension (more power) high tension (more control) rule? cheers, J

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From Adz - 30 Jul 2008 - 00:33

Tough one to call on the x-one.

 

Thinner guage strings are naturally strung at a lower tension to the thicker strings to account for further stretching when pulled to tension. Traditionally a tighter string bed after a point will give you better touch but less power as the bed will be too firm for the strings to flex and generate any spring. With this in mind a string bed that is too soft will also be too spongy providing too much flex and ultimately absorb the ball more thus lowering the power and giving you poor touch.

So in short:

Too tight and you get control but no power

Too springy and you get no touch AND no power

Then you get tight strings (but not too tight) which will give you a firmer bed for touch but still have spring enough for power. Now a thinner string will normally give you good elasticity (sponginess) and therefore strung slightly tight will provide excellent touch and power. HOWEVER, thin stringss with a firm tension will be more prone to breakages.

 

So in answer, assuming the Wilson N-Code has a recommended string tension of 22-28lbs, and you want the strings on the firm side for best power / touch combination, I'd go for slightly above the average tension (e.g. 26lbs).

 

HOWEVER (again!), thinner strings, especially the x-one, are recommended to be strung at a lower tension to achieve the same results, and normally you should take off 10-20% of the tension amount that is normally quoted, so in your case I'd get the x-one strung at around 22-24lbs which will be the equivalent to around 25-27lbs.

 

As an idea, I'm currently using Ashaway Powernick 18 and string the racquet at 24lbs which will be closer to 27-28lbs of tension. But I'm a big lad and capable of really cracking the ball so the power loss isn't a big problem for me. But if I wanted to string my racquets for optimium power I'd drop a lb or two out of the string tension (note that this would probably lose some touch).

 

Once again it depends on what you are looking for (touch or power or both!).

 

Cheers

 

Adz

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From yaehbhi - 30 Jul 2008 - 00:09

Hi All,

I need to restrung my Wilson ncode 120 with TECNIFIBRE X-One BiPhase RED 1.18mm. Could someone please suggest what would be a good tension for it.

I restrung my Head Metallix 150 with the same string with 27 lbs tension, but I seem to have lost too much power.

What difference does it make to restrung with different tensions in mains and across.

 

 

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From Adz - 27 Jun 2008 - 07:58

Ashaway Powernick 18 Red: 18 gauge (@24lbs)

Used in: Dunlop ICE Elite

Paid: Reel imported from abroad under different exchange rate (est UK price of £8 per set / £80 per reel)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: Been using this string for quite some time and tend to only change the strings when they begin to feel lifeless. 

REVIEW:

Its been a while since I last posted on this thread, and in that time I've tried many different strings, but have to say this one is by far the best! At the narrower guage (18) you'd expect this string to have a shorter life-span than some other thicker strings, but so far I've only managed to break one set! The thin guage gives an incredible bite into the ball, helped by the slightly textured string. The thinner guage also gives a wonderful elasticity to the string helping the power aspect greatly. The string is also very easy to string with, but as with any top of the range string, it can be quite costly. Do some shopping around before you just wildly spend out on them. Getting a set for £5-7 is a good deal and definitely worth a trial!

Cheers

 

Adz

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From zatoichi - 25 Jun 2008 - 09:10

 

My humble rookie opinion


 

string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness)

Tecnifibre x-one squash biphase 18 guage (1.18mm)


 

The racket Brand and Model which contains the string

Karakal sx-100 (weight 147 grams incl. String, 1 wilson overgrip and babolat crash tape)

Headsize 455 sq cm Balance 36-37 cm 14x19 string pattern, (fan) teardrop

Tension

recommended string tension 26-30 lbs.

I went for 29 lbs, on a crank/ manual spring tension, Gamma Progression ST II

What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)

Free (I own my own stringing machine) // strings, wherever I can find the best deal online

Your location - Bergen = one of the wettest towns in Europe

Your game type - touch, fast, relaxed, furious - depends on the opponent

 


 

Karakal sx-100 is a very light racket, the lightest that I have come across,
being light, i compensate with a fast swing – and good strings.
I am really happy with the power,
but what i really like is the muted feel the strings seems to have at this tension in this frame,
which in turn gives a sensation of control, the ball kinda dies on the stringbed, for a fraction of a second, before effortlessly flying off.

I was hitting a little after stringing, and compared to the factory strings, I have slightly more control given the tinner guage, and at this tension the strings hardly move out of position. When it comes to power, I felt impressed by the liveliness the string at this tension, didn't expect that..


 


 

Your average time between restrings –

I tend to break strings approximately every 5th week, ( I play 5-6 times a week)


 

general review comments about the strings

A lovely blend of muted liveliness.

In my humble opinion these strings works beautifully with karakal sx-100s stringpattern and lightweight, adding a little power, but not taking away the control, I feel that touch, drops, power all comes beautifully together..

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From drop-shot - 28 Feb 2007 - 23:03   -   Updated: 28 Feb 2007 - 23:26

Hello everybody,

here's my few pennies on strings:

  • string type(s) (Brand, model, gauge (thickness)
          Ashaway SuperNick®XL Micro/ 18 Micro (1.15 mm) gauge
  • The racket Brand and Model which contains the string
    Wilson® n120 (weight 120 g)
    Headsize 76 sq in // 488 sq cm Balance 37.00 cm/ Head Heavy
  • Tension
              11/13 kg  equal to 24.5/28.5 lbs
  • What you pay per restring (labour and string costs)
                Euro 10/ labour // strings bought in reel at squashgear.com
  • Your location - Bruxelles = so called Capital of Europe
  • Your game type - touch, fast, relaxed, furious - depends on the opponent
             Although n120 is a light racket, Head heavy balance plus Ashaway strings give it                 incredible power so I can use it.
  • Your average time between restrings -- I use three rackets strung the same way and I do not need to restring more often than once per 6 months.
    In case of total disaster with my Wilson n120 I can use: Wilson ntour with Tecnifibre 305 or Head i.140 with Red Ashaway or Esquash with turquise Ashaway I am a deviant on racketts
  • Your average time between breaking strings (this is different to point 3)
    when I used Wilson ncode ntour racket strung with Red Ashaway or TF 305 I had to restrung very often (thanks god my coach strung them for me for free and I had a chance to check all the range of Ashaway and Tecnifibre and esquash strings),
    now when I switched to Wilson n120 and Supernick XL Micro I do not have problems. Note: I always liked very tough tensions.
  • general review comments about the strings
    Very solid and long-lasting strings. In my rookie opinion those strings helped my game in touch dropshots. Next time I will try to string tougher.

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From Adz - 28 Feb 2007 - 21:37

matt,

 

Glad to hear that this thread is of use to you. The reason that I use different tensions is to do with the lengths of the strings in question. A slightly lower tension main string mixed with a slightly higher tension cross string just seems to feel right for the racquet and string  combination that I'm using. Also this combination seems to last longer than others that I've used.

I think the first time I went for different tensions was because the cross and main strings were different types (one was a multifilament and was was a multifilament with monofilament core). This is particularly useful on tear-drop shaped racquets (like Princes) where the mains tend to be much longer than the crosses.

 

The crosses being around 26lbs make for really nice touch, whilst the mains in a Grays/Dunlop oval head racquet at just a bit less will give enough flex to add a fair bit of power when used with a "springier" string (something with some snap to it!).

 

I'm going to add another review soon of a new string that I've used, so that'll be something interesting to add.

Adz

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From bava - 28 Feb 2007 - 18:53

Adz

Firstly thanks for posting info on strings, I've been through such pains trying to source information on the net.

Quick question for you on your tensions?  Why do you tension 25.5lbs mains and 26lbs crosses.  Why not both the same?  Im interested to know what effect this has on power / touch.

Thanks for your time

Matt

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From Adz - 19 Jan 2007 - 21:42

Ashaway Supernick XL Pro: 17 gauge (1.25) (@25.5lbs mains and 26lbs crosses)

Used in: Gray's Powerflow Elite

Paid: £6.04 imported from Malaysia (9m single set)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: I've been restringing my racquets quite often recently in order to try out lots of different strings.

 

REVIEW:

I admit, whilst stretching I left the ball on a radiator to heat through before going on court. My first reaction was that the ball must have been red-hot becuase it was flying around the court in the warm up. I stopped to check and the ball felt warm but not as hot as it seemed. Could these strings really be THAT powerful compared to anything I'd previously used? Simple answer - YES! I spent an hour and a quarter getting used to them and bedding them in properly and I have to say that these strings feel amazing. I can now understand why they justify their high price tag.

The string is a nylon multifilament construction with a textured surface for grip on the ball. I hit some drive with a slight cut on the ball that actually appeared to curve in mid air, and a hard boast came off the front wall at an angle I didn't think was possible! I have to admit I was in awe. Durability could still be a question, but I'll keep the post updated with information, until then I'm on the hunt for the cheapest place to get a reel of these strings for (I think I can get them delivered for the UK equivalent of £3.50 a set, but time will tell!)

 For someone looking to get a string with high levels of touch (due to texture) and incredible power, then this string could well live up to its claims of being one of the best on the market. 

This is definately something I'd recommend to regular or more advanced club players, and more serious players should also find everything they're looking for here.

 

Adz

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From Adz - 28 Dec 2006 - 20:56   -   Updated: 19 Jan 2007 - 21:43

Pro's Pro Clay Court: 16L gauge (1.29) (@25.5lbs mains and 26lbs crosses)

Used in: Gray's Powerflow Elite

Paid: £2.75 in UK (12m single set)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: I've been restringing my racquets quite often recently in order to try out lots of different strings.

 

REVIEW:

As mentioned in a previous review, the Pro's Pro range of strings is extremely cheap. And a reel of these strings works out at around £1.80 per set for squash rackets. My aim was to find a multifilament string with a bit of texture, that played very nicely for power and touch alike. The string comes in a rather neat looking yellow with black stripes, and once strung I knew it would be lovely to play with. I've currently put in around 8 hours on court and the string is fantastic. The durability seems to be holding (no sign of notching or fraying yet), and the tension seems to have stayed the same since the first 25 mins on court. Because the string is slightly thicker than most other multifilament squash strings, it should have quite good durability, and the tension should continue to hold very well.

 

For someone looking to get a string of a similar type and style to the Ashaway Supernick XL, this string could definately hold its own. At this low price, you may as well give it a try, and if you don't like it, you can cut it out and try something else!

 

This is definately something I'd recommend to regular or more advanced club players, but more serious players might want a thinner string.

 

UPDATE: This string has now held its tension extremely well for over 40 hours of play with little to no signs of damage.

Adz

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From BizarreCo - 20 Dec 2006 - 02:09

Ah! Spot the deliberate mistake  as Tecnifibre 305 doesn't come in 1.10mm! It should have been:

Tecnifibre 305 in 1.30mm and 1.20mm and Tecnifibre 225 in 1.10mm.

I've been trying to find some cheaper alternatives to these strings and will post some reviews shortly that come in at a much more affordable price point (£2.50 per set as opposed to £7 or £8 per set from UK suppliers).

I've got 3 different string type to try ranging in prices and gauges.

I'll post the reviews as and when I've tried them out

Adz

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From BizarreCo - 18 Dec 2006 - 19:17

Iamspartacus, thanks for the acknowledgment and I hope this thread continues to help you and everyone else out!

Stevep, thanks for adding the review on the Tecnifibre 305 string. I know a lot of people who use this string (in various gauges) but have yet to try it for myself.

In general, this is what I've found from others:

1.10mm (18 gauge) gives excellent "bite" on the ball and is the best for power, but has lower durability. This string tends to fray quite quickly and snaps shortly afterward.

1.30mm (16 gauge) gives far better durability and is a great all-round string. This string will fray but lasts longer than the 1.10mm.

Overall I've been told that these strings provide good touch (as Stevep said - better once fraying begins), and they also provide excellent power when strung to the correct tensions.

Keep the reviews coming and I'll add some more when I try some new strings!

Adz

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From stevo - 14 Dec 2006 - 11:08

ADZ

What machine did you get and how much did it cost you? Also where do you get your string from, it sounds like you are getting a good deal.

Here is my opinion of my string although I haven't used much else to compare against so I don't really know what I am talking about

Tecnifibre 305 (green), 17 guage (I think), 25lbs

Used In: Dunlop Ice Elite (Powers racket)

Game Type: Steady. A bit of a runner compared to my opponents at my current grade. OK touch (especially with this racket and string).

Restring Information: I normally get the racket restrung every 3/4 months

Review:
I didn't like the factory strings so I replaced with this. Very durable (I find anyway) and the feel gets better as the string frays. The touch is really nice especially on the drop shots, but probably due to a combination of the racket feel and the strings. I prefer the slightly looser tension to try to generate extra power from the racket.

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From nickhitter - 14 Dec 2006 - 02:34

Thanks for the reviews adz

On behalf of myself and I'm sure many others in the forum, thanks for these contributions and information. Once I have played with a lot more defferent strings myself I'll start posting some reviews also.

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From BizarreCo - 13 Dec 2006 - 20:47

Pro's Pro Hexaspin: 17 gauge (1.25) (@25.5lbs mains and 26lbs crosses)

Used in: Dunlop ICE Tour & Gray's Powerflow Elite

Paid: £1.50 in UK (Bought as a 200m reel - est 10m used for stringing - strung myself)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: I normally resting my rackets when the strings break, which is approximately 60 hours of play per racket - This is now changing as I understand more about strings.

 

REVIEW:

When I first considered stringing my own racquets, I contacted a specialist stringing firm and was amazed by their high levels of customer service. The lady I spoke to knew everything about the strings and was able to recommend not only the machine I eventually bought, but also a cheap set of strings for my to learn to string with.

The Pro's Pro range of strings is cheap. VERY cheap in fact. A reel of the strings works out at around £1.50 per set for squash rackets, and at a 17 guage, they fit the racquets perfectly. The string is modern material, monofilament polyester and as such feels softer than other older polyester strings. The string appears to have high durability, and holds its tension reasonably well. However being monofilament polyster, expect the string to stretch first and then break suddenly. Also due to the string being monofilament polyester, don't expect it to feel fantastic if you play a more touch orientated style of play.

For a lower standard club player, this string would be perfect for someone who regularly breaks strings. Use it in the whole of the racket to provide a reasonable power base with a high durability. However, where this string would be best suited, is to use in a hybrid string combination as the mains. Mixing with a multifilament nylon cross string could provide a nice base for touch and power combinations at a VERY cheap price!

Worth a look for beginners or hybrid stringers, otherwise there'll be better strings out there for your needs.

Adz

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From BizarreCo - 13 Dec 2006 - 20:34

Well, I've done my research and talked to every stringer I can find who'll give me 5 mins of their time. I now know so much more than ever before about strings. I understand monofilaments, multifilaments, synthetics, nylons, polyesters, coatings, zyex, aramid, duraflex, tension retention, oli filings, jelly fillings ARGH MY HEAD IS HURTING!!!!

 

I think I've covered it all and will now start adding reviews of strings to this page as and when I try new string types!

Adz

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From BizarreCo - 21 Nov 2006 - 22:27

Thanks for those Rippa. When doing my original research, those two threads were about the best information I could find.

 

But there aren't enough! Us players need more information and more pooled knowledge! Come on people! Get your reviews written on this thread!

Adz

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From rippa rit - 21 Nov 2006 - 07:19   -   Updated: 21 Nov 2006 - 07:21

BizzareCo - here is the link to a previous article about strings which might have some useful info
Also here is the tension link for some more reading.

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From BizarreCo - 20 Nov 2006 - 21:22

Head Ti Boast: 16 gauge (@25.5lbs)

Used in: Dunlop ICE Tour

Paid: £15 in Midlands, UK (unsure of split between string cost / labour but you can buy the strings for around £6-£8 a set online)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: I normally resting my rackets when the strings break, which is approximately 60 hours of play per racket.

 

REVIEW:

When I first came upon these strings I was looking for the closest match I could find to the factory fitted Dunlop strings. These just happened to be the closest match that was stocked by the stringer at the time.

As luck would have it, the strings were perfect for this racket and my game style. The slightly thick 16 gauge meant that the durability of the strings was higher than your average squash string, and the elasticity of the strings meant they generated a far amount of power whilst mixed with a nice feel to the shot allowing for solid touch shots.

At this tension the strings allowed a lot of coverage for mis-hit or off-center shots. I found that the racket could generate a large amount of power for tight rail shots, but was not optimised for perfect power on the true sweet-spot contacts. I'd expect this to be better with a slightly higher string tension.

The strings in the centre of the racket don't tend to fray at all, although some notching occurs which eventually caused a complete breakage. Due to the nature of the Dunlop rackets, the edges of the strings, which sit proud of the frame on the sides of the racket, tend to fray slightly from floor/wall impacts. This would definately lead to breakage over time.

These strings provide a forgiving touch with nice power and should definately be tried by improving club players who are looking for something durable, playable and powerful without spending a fortune!

Adz

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From BizarreCo - 20 Nov 2006 - 21:11

Head Intellistring: 16L gauge Mains (@26lbs) with 17 gauge Crosses (@26.5lbs)

Used in: Gray's Powerflow Elite

Paid: £20 in Midlands, UK (unsure of split between string cost / labour but you can buy the strings for around £8-£10 a set online)

Game type: Slow, touch player in general but I like to mix with power play and speed on occasion. Strings and tensions need to cover both styles of play.

Restring information: I normally resting my rackets when the strings break, but this time I've decided to change all of the strings in my rackets at once as I've changed to this new string from another Head model. The other model of strings would break on average every 250 hours on court (approx!). But I do rotate between 4 rackets, so I'd guess each set lasts around 60 ish hours on court (please bear in mind that that was the old string model and these new ones are as yet untested!).

 

REVIEW:

After having a great experience of Head Stings I felt that it was certainly a brand that I wanted to continue with. I looked into different string types and brands before coming to the conclusion that I wanted to change to a slightly thinner gauge string (my normal is a 16). The Head Intellistring is actually two different string types in the same packet. The 16L multifilament string is used for the mains and the 17 gauge ribbon type string is used for the crosses. I also took the decision to slightly increase my normal tension to fine tune the power/touch balance.

The 17 gauge crosses provide excellant touch on the ball and placed shots seem effortless. The 16 gauge main are designed to generate the power aspect of the shots, and at this time I think that I'm had the strings strung too tightly. The power of a perfect sweet-spot contact is amazing, but anything off center (like tight rail shots) seems muted and a little dull. After about an hour of play the strings showed the beginnings of fraying, although after 3 hours of play this had disappeared (perhaps the fibres were just some sort of coating which had worn off by hour 3?).

I'd recommend these strings for anyone who is looking for a mix of power and control, but be sure to get your tensions correct for your racket and game type!

Adz

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